Posts Tagged ‘animal rights’

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The WTO clubs baby seals?

March 28, 2011

That’s a headline you might expect to see at FreeTradeKillsAnimals.org in the very near future. The WTO has just established three panels addressing complaints from Canada and Norway regarding the European Union’s recent decision (plus older regulations in Belgium and the Netherlands) to ban imports of seal pelts due to “the concerns expressed by EU citizens about seal products from hunts which involve shooting seals and clubbing them to death.” In non-trade-wonk language, Canada and Norway are asking the WTO to strike down the EU ban on seal products.

Canada’s request for the establishment of a panel claims that the EU regulations violate its obligations under the GATT and TBT agreements, and describes the issue thusly:

The European Union trade ban prohibits the importation and the placing on the market for sale in the European Union customs territory of any seal product except: (a) those derived from hunts traditionally conducted by Inuit and other indigenous communities, which contribute to their subsistence; and (b) those that are by-products of a hunt regulated by national law and with the sole purpose of sustainable management of marine resources. In addition, seal products for personal use may be imported but may not be placed on the market. The effect of the trade ban, in combination with the implementing measure, is to restrict virtually all trade in seal products within the European Union, and in particular with respect to seal products of Canadian origin.

If the WTO rules against the EU, it will be yet another case of a democratically established regulation intended to protect the environment being overturned in favor of an ideal of free-flowing unregulated commerce. Canada’s case will likely be that its seal-product export industry is a crucial part of the livelihoods of some of its vulnerable populations, and that the hunting of seals is done in a sustainable manner. The Canadian chapter of the Humane Society International (an organization which, is should be noted, is hardly a reliable opponent of current “free-trade” policies) anticipates these arguments:

National polling consistently shows the overwhelming majority of Canadians want the commercial seal hunt to end, oppose the Canadian government using tax dollars to promote the sealing industry and support the rights of foreign nations to prohibit trade in seal products… Canada’s seal slaughter is conducted by commercial fishermen who earn, on average, less than 5 percent of their annual income from killing seals.

It is worth noting that the U.S. banned the importation of seal products from Canada in 1972’s Marine Mammal Protection Act – yes, the same MMPA that was weakened by the famous GATT tuna-dolphin case. Furthermore, in 2005, a bipartisan resolution was introduced in the Senate calling on Canada to end the commercial hunting of seals.

In sum, Canada’s reaction to international pressure from the EU and the United States regarding its seal-hunting industry is not to eliminate or downside said industry, but instead to defend it using a minimally accountable transnational commercial institution that has historically sided with commercial interests over environmental protection or other sound regulatory measures. This is a rather telling indicator of the power of global commerce over international norms about environmental and consumer protection.

That said, environmental and animal rights organizations tend to have massive clout with American and European publics when they can show that cute furry cuddly things are in danger. And few things are cuter, furrier or cuddlier than baby seals (evidence above courtesy of Google Images). So this is also a golden opportunity for such organizations to raise a stink about the structure of the global economy; whether they are able to take advantage, and how they frame the broader issues at hand, will be very interesting to see.

Flying Whale

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Exhibit A of mixed-up priorities: the NFL

August 17, 2009

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This has been said before many times, but with all the ongoing vitriol (especially from folks in Philadelphia) about Michael Vick’s return to the NFL after serving time for running dog fights, it keeps bumping back up to the front of my brain. A very simple illustration of facts shows just how messed up our society (slash justice system, sports culture, etc etc) is:

Case A. Former Atlanta Falcons star quarterback Michael Vick pleads guilty to operating a dogfighting ring. He is sentenced to 23 months in federal prison, of which he serves 18 before being released to home confinement. Upon his release he is reinstated to the NFL (after a two-year absence from the league) and picked up by the Philadelphia Eagles. Eagles fans and fans around the country go crazy, objecting to the reinstatement. Throughout the ordeal there are high-profile protests by animal rights activists.

Case B. Cleveland Browns wide receiver Donte Stallworth kills a 59-year-old construction worker while driving drunk. He is sentenced to 30 days in jail, of which he serves 24 before being released to home confinement. He will be reinstated to the NFL in 2010 (after a one-year absence from the league). There is very little high-profile public outrage around Stallworth’s case.

Draw your own conclusions.

Flying Whale